The Tide Project News
Nov 29 2017

Lauren has received a grant for a short-term residency at the Anthropology Library in the British Museum next spring, where she will be one of two RAI fellows for the upcoming year. Her research will focus on gaining a deeper anthropological understanding of Native American material culture, to better understand the role of indigenous objects in shaping discourses about Englishness and empire in the late sixteenth and early seventeenth centuries. How can historians learn to 'see' and interpret the indigenous artefacts that individuals collected, appropriated, and brought back to England, particularly in ways that restore greater agency to Native Americans and their systems of belief and knowledge-transmission beyond texts? How can the more nuanced study of Algonquian and Tupí artefacts - their colours, natural properties, and the technical production of pearls, shells, fur, and feathers - and the way the English used these objects shed light on early modern civility and consumption? The longer-term aim will be to link these initial encounters and artefacts to the afterlives of objects, encouraging greater dialogue among museums and visitors about the legacies of colonialism, and about the relationship between the Native American objects in domestic collections and national heritage. The RAI committee has commended Lauren for offering 'new perspectives on historical anthropology and the role that Native Americans and their material culture played in English people's conceptions of themselves, their nation, and their empire'.

Nov 14 2017

Join us just north of of the City walls in Finsbury Square for an open performance workshop exploring the diverse audiences of Elizabethan playhouses and their surrounding neighbourhoods. We will ask: Who visited Elizabethan playhouses? What might it mean to put “non-English” characters on stage? What do playwrights’ engagement with the issues of immigration, identity, and belonging tell us about late sixteenth-century playing spaces?

This experimental workshop will stage extracts from a number of sixteenth century plays that dramatise the economic, social, and cultural issues of immigration in order to further understand both Elizabethan attitudes to "foreignness" and our own relationship to Renaissance drama. These readings will be informed by a wide array of non-dramatic documents from the period - such as letters, diaries, travel reports, orders from the London Mayor, and official lists of immigrant residents - and will be open to staging suggestions and discussion from audience members.

Everybody is welcome and no knowledge of the history or drama of the period is necessary. We invite participants to contribute to discussions, and we will end with an open conversation reflecting on the issues raised in the workshop. If you have any queries or questions, please do be in contact with TIDE or Before Shakespeare. Audiences, Immigration and Belonging in Elizabethan Theatres is a collaborative workshop between the European Research Council-funded TIDE project, the Arts and Humanities Research Council UK-funded Before Shakespeare project, and The Dolphin’s Back.

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Oct 30 2017
TIDE writer in residence, Sarah Howe

Sarah Howe, TIDE Writer in Residence, and TS Eliot Prize-winning author of Loop of Jade will read with University of Liverpool's Colm Toibin Fellow in Creative Writing, the novelist Anthony Joseph.

Tuesday 14 November 5.30pm, School of the Arts Library, 19 Abercromby Square.

Funded by the European Research Council and in association with the Centre for New and International Writing at the University of Liverpool.

Register here

Oct 24 2017

Join us next week, for a sandwich-fuelled celebration of the completion of our first year:

Wednesday, November 1

at noon

in The Old Library, School of the Arts

to meet the team, and find out more about our work over the next 4 years.

We very much hope to see you there.

Aug 17 2017

The University of Liverpool’s School of the Arts invites expressions of interest for the 2017/18 British Academy Postdoctoral Fellowship scheme. These awards offer opportunities for outstanding early career researchers to strengthen their experience of research and teaching in a university environment – further information, including eligibility criteria, can be found here.

The University of Liverpool is one of the United Kingdom’s leading research institutions with an annual turnover of £400 million, including £140 million for research. Liverpool is ranked in the top 1% of universities worldwide and is a member of the prestigious Russell Group, comprising the leading research universities in the United Kingdom.

The Department of English conducts research in three main areas: literature, language, and creative writing. We aim to foster and develop strategic partnerships, particularly with local and national cultural organisations, to reach those who can benefit from our research. Impact is achieved in the following core areas:

• Widening, deepening and challenging public understanding of literature and its cultural contexts, particularly through public service broadcasting, national exhibitions, and live literature events

• Development of impacts and potential impacts of literature on health, well-being and quality of life, delivered primarily through long-standing links with The Reader Organisation

• Stimulation of cultural and creative activity and an extension of the reach and possibilities of language and the imagination, through public lectures, workshops, and live literature events

• Assessing, shaping and changing literary and cultural value - our researchers have acted as judges for international literature prizes, including the Man Booker and National Poetry Competition

Since 2010, we have been part of the School of Arts, one of four Schools in the Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences. The School also includes the departments of Architecture, Communications and Media, Music and Philosophy.

Those interested in applying for a Postdoctoral Fellowship at the University of Liverpool are invited to submit expressions of interest to Professor David Seed (sotares@liverpool.ac.uk), by 5pm on Monday 4th September 2017, consisting of the following:

• CV (2 pages max) and a list of publications (1 page max)

• an outline (2 pages max) of the research proposal, including intended publication outputs

• 100-word abstract

• Identification of potential mentor

Applicants to be supported by the Department will be informed by 8th September. All shortlisted candidates will be invited to attend a workshop in the week commencing 18th September (date to be confirmed), which will include presentations and advice about the scheme, and give candidates the opportunity to meet with their chosen mentor.

May 23 2017

TIDE is pleased to invite you to its second seminar of 2017, on the theme of ‘Turks and Mahometans: Presence and Perception in Early Modern England’. Join us to hear Jyotsna G. Singh (Michigan State University) speak on the English contacts with Islam in Mughal India, Matthew Dimmock (University of Sussex) on Muslim experiences in early modern England, and Eva Johanna Holmberg (University of Helsinki; Queen Mary, University of London) on English perceptions of non-Muslim communities in the Levant.

Monday, 26 June (15:00-18:00), at The University of Liverpool in London, 33 Finsbury Square

Please register by June 18th

We very much hope to see you there!

May 18 2017

Application for 2 fully-funded PhD positions now open on the TIDE project, under the supervision of the project director, Professor Nandini Das.

Applications are invited from candidates with a strong background in early modern literary studies. The proposed PhD project should explore responses to and practice of transculturality in early modern English literature and culture within the period from 1550-1700.

Deadline for application June 20, 2017

Informal enquiries about project ideas are welcome and should be directed by email to Professor Nandini Das (ndas@liverpool.ac.uk). For more general enquiries about the contact the TIDE administrator Emma-Louise Whitehead at tide@liverpool.ac.uk.

Mar 31 2017

Friday 5th May 19.00 - London Review Bookshop, WC1A 2JL

The fleeting appearance of black faces in Tudor paintings marks the silent presence of a community's untold story. Who were the black men and women who lived, loved, and died in Renaissance Britain? How did they arrive? And how can we recover their voices when all we have is a glimpse in a portrait here, or church and court record there?

In the great age of travel and discovery, human mobility, both voluntary and forced, left its mark on art, culture, political debates, and on European imagination itself. Black presence in Renaissance Britain forms an essential part of that bigger story. Writer D'Aguiar and historians Olusoga and Fletcher join Nandini Das, director of TIDE, to explore the challenge of using fiction to recover those lost voices in history.

An event in partnership with the London Review Bookshop.

Mar 31 2017

Tuesday 25th April 17.30 - School of the Arts, 19 Abercromby Square, University of Liverpool

Fred D’Aguiar’s dozen books of fiction and poetry have been translated into several languages. His first novel, The Longest Memory, won the Whitbread First Novel Award and was made into a film by Channel 4 (UK). His essays and poetry have appeared in The New Yorker, Harper’s, The Guardian, Wasafiri, Callaloo, Best American Essays and elsewhere. His play, A Jamaican Airman Foresees His Death, was produced at the Royal Court Theatre in London. His radio play, Days and Nights in Bedlam, was broadcast by the BBC, along with several recent short stories. Continental Shelf, a U.K. Poetry Book Society Choice, was shortlisted for the UK’s T.S. Eliot Prize in 2009. His latest poetry collection is The Rose of Toulouse. His latest novel, Children of Paradise (HarperCollins, US; Granta, UK), is inspired by the events at Jonestown. Born in London in 1960 of Guyanese parents and brought up in Guyana and London, he is currently Professor of English at the University of California, Los Angeles.

Places are limited, so please register your place early to avoid disappointment!

Mar 31 2017

Miriam Allott lecture: Tuesday 25th April 17.30 - School of the Arts, 19 Abercromby Square, University of Liverpool

Book your place here: lecture entry is ticketed but free of charge.

Lost Voices: Fred D'Aguiar, David Olusoga, and Catherine Fletcher in conversation with Nandini Das

Friday 5th May 19.00 - London Review Bookshop, WC1A 2JL

The fleeting appearance of black faces in Tudor paintings marks the silent presence of a community's untold story. Who were the black men and women who lived, loved, and died in Renaissance Britain? How did they arrive? And how can we recover their voices when all we have is a glimpse in a portrait here, or church and court record there?

In the great age of travel and discovery, human mobility, both voluntary and forced, left its mark on art, culture, political debates, and on European imagination itself. Black presence in Renaissance Britain forms an essential part of that bigger story. Writer D'Aguiar and historians Olusoga and Fletcher join Nandini Das, director of TIDE, to explore the challenge of using fiction to recover those lost voices in history.

An event in partnership with the London Review Bookshop.

Fred D'Aguiar

Born in London in 1960, Fred D’Aguiar spent his childhood in Guyana before returning to England at the age of 12. His memories of the Caribbean and subsequent impressions of life in the UK, as well as his former role as a psychiatric nurse, deeply inform his writing. He has now written a dozen books of fiction and poetry, and is based in Los Angeles (Director of Creative Writing, UCLA). Translated into several languages, his award-winning work has been broadcast on radio, produced on stage, and made into film. His first novel, The Longest Memory, won both the David Higham Prize and the Whitbread First Novel Award, and was adapted for television by Channel 4. Continental Shelf, a U.K. Poetry Book Society Choice, was shortlisted for the 2009 T. S. Eliot Prize. His latest collection, The Rose of Toulouse (2013), charts his own personal history and travel; his latest novel, Children of Paradise (2014), deals with the events in 1978 at Jonestown. Fred’s essays and short stories have been widely published. He has also written, both creatively and in articles for the press, in response to gun violence in America, where he has lived and taught since the 1990s.

Fred D’Aguiar is the inaugural Writer in Residence for the TIDE project, and hosted in collaboration with The Centre for New and International Writing.

David Olusoga

David Olusoga is a British-Nigerian historian, broadcaster and film-maker. Born in Lagos, Nigeria David is a multi-award-winning presenter. His most recent series include The World’s War: Forgotten Soldiers of Empire (BBC 2) and the BAFTA winning Britain’s Forgotten Slave Owners (BBC 2). He is also a regular presenter on The One Show. David is the author of Black & British: A Forgotten History (Macmillan, 2016), The World’s War (Head of Zeus, 2014), The Kaiser’s Holocaust: Germany’s Forgotten Genocide and the Colonial Roots of Nazism (Faber & Faber 2010), and was a contributor to the Oxford Companion to Black British History. He is currently writing a new history of slavery, 5000 Years a Slave (Head of Zeus) and a new history of the British colonisation of Tasmania entitled White Slavery and the Black War. David writes for The Guardian, The Observer, and BBC History Magazine.

Catherine Fletcher

Catherine Fletcher is Associate Professor in History and Heritage at Swansea University and author of The Black Prince of Florence: The Life of Alessandro de’ Medici (2016) and The Divorce of Henry VIII: The Untold Story from Inside the Vatican (2012). She was a BBC New Generation Thinker in 2015 and is a regular broadcaster on Radio 3. She advised on the 2014 BBC TV adaptation of Hilary Mantel’s Wolf Hall. Prior to her appointment at Swansea, she held fellowships at the Institute of Historical Research, the British School at Rome and the European University Institute, and taught at Durham and Sheffield Universities.

Dec 20 2016
For the university report on the recent formal launch of the TIDE project, see the University of Liverpool news.